File:Scientific manuscript v-0.0.1.ott

From The Document Foundation Wiki
Jump to: navigation, search
Scientific_manuscript_v-0.0.1.ott(file size: 47 KB, MIME type: application/vnd.oasis.opendocument.text-template)
Warning: This file type may contain malicious code. By executing it, your system may be compromised.

Summary

Simple template with styles formatted in the way I wrote my scientific manuscripts for submiting them for publication in a journal. It is based more or less in "tradition", but it's some kind of standard in my field.

It is based on the default Writer template, although with some modifications that can be simple to perfomed, but I think it's useful to have a template when you have to write many papers.

The main features are: Font: Liberation Serif, 12 pt, as it's the default of LibO equations. Any other font for the text should be also assigned to Math, which is not possible. Bodytext: Line spacing of 1.5 lines. Spacing below paragraph: 0.63 cm (1.5×12 pt). Headings: same font as body. All of them are numbered.

Heading 1: Liberation serif 12 pt, bold. Numberig style: "1. Heading". Line space: 1.5 lines, Spacing below: 0.63 cm
Heading 2: Liberation serif 12 pt, italic. Numberig style: "1.1. Heading". Line space: 1.5 lines, Spacing below: 0.63 cm.
Heading 3 and aabove: Liberation serif 12 pt, italic. Numberig style: "1.1.... Heading" (as many numbers as level). Line space: 1.5 lines. No space below 0.63 cm

The heading format I follow is similar to the one I've seen in publications like Fluid Phase Equilibria (Elsevier) or the Journal of Chemical Engineering Data (ACS) (before 2005). You may check the "Open Access" articles to compare. As one may see, heading 3 and above have the same format, except that the numbering includes as many numbers as the level. I haven't seen heading levels beyond 4 in manuscrips, but I think it should be enough.

One additional comment: I know that some designers hate the classical "12 pt + multiple line spacing" approach for research papers. I do agree that double spacing is too much. However, many manuscripts written by researchers 'will be' then reformatted by a designer. What we write are drafts in general. Me and my colleges still revise and correct our drafts striking out wrong text 'in paper', and writing the correction over. That's why multiple spacing is still useful.

Copyright status:

Licensing

Cc.logo.white.svgCc-zero.svg

This file is made available under the Creative Commons CC0 1.0 Universal Public Domain Dedication.
The person who associated a work with this deed has dedicated the work to the public domain by waiving all of his or her rights to the work worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law. You can copy, modify, distribute and perform the work, even for commercial purposes, all without asking permission.

Source:

LibO 4.2 default template

File history

Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time.

Date/TimeDimensionsUserComment
current2015-01-08T03:46:21 (47 KB)Phorious (talk | contribs)Added some dummy text usign the styles in a way that look like a "maniscript", with descriptions of the styles incorporated into the template using comments.
2015-01-04T19:20:29 (12 KB)Phorious (talk | contribs)Simple template with styles formatted in the way I wrote my scientific manuscripts for submiting them for publication in a journal. It is based more or less in "tradition", but it's some kind of standard in my field. It is based on the default Writer...
  • You cannot overwrite this file.

The following 2 pages link to this file: