Documentation/Calc Functions/SUMIFS

From The Document Foundation Wiki
Jump to navigation Jump to search
This page contains changes which are not marked for translation.
Other languages:
English • ‎dansk



Function name:

SUMIFS

Category:

Mathematical

Summary:

Calculates the sum of a set of numbers in a cell range, with the cells to be added together determined using multiple criteria. The primary difference between SUMIFS and Calc’s SUMIF function is that the latter is limited to evaluating only one criterion.

The criteria passed to SUMIFS can utilize wildcards or regular expressions.

Syntax:

SUMIFS(SumRange; Range 1; Criterion 1[; Range 2; Criterion 2[; … [; Range 127; Criterion 127]]])

Returns:

Returns a real number that is the result of adding together the numbers in relevant cells.

Arguments:

SumRange argument

SumRange specifies the cells to be summed. SumRange usually takes one of the following forms:

  • A reference to a cell range (for example, A1:A25), which may not utilize the reference concatenation operator (~).
  • The name of a named range.
  • The name of a database range.

Range arguments

Range 1 specifies the set of cells to be matched against Criterion 1 and takes one of the forms listed for SumRange. Range 1 should have the same dimensions as SumRange.

Range 2, ..., Range 127 have the same meaning as Range 1.

Criterion arguments

Criterion 1 is the criterion for matching against the cells in Range 1, or a cell containing that criterion. Criterion 1 can take one of the following forms:

  • A number, such as 34.5. Dates and logical values (TRUE or FALSE) are treated as numbers.
  • An expression, such as 2/3, SQRT($D$1), or DATE(2021; 11; 1).
  • A text string, such as "golf" or "<>10".

SUMIFS looks for cells in Range 1 that are equal to Criterion 1, unless Criterion 1 is a text string that starts with a comparator (>, <, >=, <=, =, or <>). In the latter case SUMIFS compares the cells in Range 1 with the remainder of the text string (interpreted as a number if possible and text otherwise). For example, the condition ">4.5" tests if the content of each cell is greater than the number 4.5, the condition "<dog" tests if the content of each cell comes alphabetically before the text "dog", and the condition "<>2021-11-01" tests if the content of each cell is not equal to the specified date.

Criterion 1 supports the following specific behaviors:

  • The string "=" matches empty cells. For example the formula =SUMIFS(A1:A10; B1:B10; "=") returns the sum of all values in the range A1:A10 if all cells in the range B1:B10 are empty. Note that "=0" does not match empty cells.
  • The string "<>" matches non-empty cells. For example the formula =SUMIFS(A1:A10; C1:C10; "<>") returns the sum of all values in the range A1:A10 if there are no empty cells in the range C1:C10.
  • If the value after the <> comparator is not empty, then Criterion 1 matches any cell content except that value, including empty cells.

Criterion 2, ..., Criterion 127 have the same meaning as Criterion 1.

Error conditions

  • If any cell range passed as an argument contains a reference concatenation operator (~), then SUMIFS reports an invalid argument error (Err:502).
  • All the cell ranges passed as arguments (SumRange and Range 1, …, Range 127) must occupy the same number of rows and the same number of columns. If this is not the case, then SUMIFS reports an invalid argument error (Err:502).
  • If the Range n and Criterion n arguments are not correctly paired, then SUMIFS reports a variable missing error (Err:511).

Additional details:

Details specific to SUMIFS function

  • The default matching performed by SUMIFS is case-insensitive. However, a case-sensitive match can be carried out when using a regular expression by including a mode modifier "(?-i)" within the regular expression, as demonstrated by one of the examples below.
  • The behavior of SUMIFS is affected by several settings available on the Tools > Options > LibreOffice Calc > Calculate dialog (LibreOffice > Preferences > LibreOffice Calc > Calculate on macOS).
  1. If the checkbox is ticked for Search criteria = and <> must apply to whole cells, then the condition "red" will match only "red"; if unticked it will match "red", "Fred", "red herring".
  2. If the checkbox is ticked for Enable wildcards in formulas, the condition will match using wildcards - so for example "b?g" will match "bag", "beg", "big", "bog", and "bug".
  3. If the checkbox is ticked for Enable regular expressions in formulas, the condition will match using regular expressions - so for example "r.d" will match "red", "rid", and "rod", while "red.*" will match "red", "redraw", and "redden".
  4. The setting of the Case sensitive checkbox has no impact on the operation of SUMIFS.

General information about Calc's regular expressions

Note pin.svg

For convenience, the information in this subsection is repeated on all pages describing functions that manipulate regular expressions.


  • A regular expression is a string of characters defining a pattern of text that is to be matched. More detailed, general background information can be found on Wikipedia’s Regular expression page.
  • Regular expressions are widely used in many domains and there are multiple regular expression processors available. Calc utilises the open source Regular Expressions package from the International Components for Unicode (ICU), see their Regular Expressions documentation for further details, including a full definition of the syntax for ICU Regular Expressions.
  • Calc’s regular expression engine supports numbered capture groups, which allow sub-ranges within a match to be identified and used within replacement text. Parentheses are used to group components of a regular expression together and create a numbered capture group. To insert a capture group into a replacement text, use the "$n" form, where n is the number of the capture group.

General information about Calc's wildcards

Wildcards are special characters that can be used in search strings passed as arguments to some Calc functions; they can also be used to define search criteria in the Find & Replace dialog. The use of wildcards enables the definition of more advanced search parameters with a single search string.

Calc supports either wildcards or regular expressions as arguments depending on the current application settings. By default, wildcards are supported instead of regular expressions.

To make sure wildcards are supported, go to Tools > Options > LibreOffice Calc > Calculate and check if the option Enable wildcards in formulas is selected. Note that you can use this dialog to switch to regular expressions by choosing Enable regular expressions in formulas or choose to support neither wildcards nor regular expressions.

The following table identifies the wildcards that Calc supports.

Calc wildcards
Wildcard Description
? (question mark) Matches any single character. For example, the search string "b?g" matches "bag" and "beg" but will not match "boog" or "mug".

Note that it will not match "bg" as well, since "?" must match exactly one character. The "?" wildcard does not correspond to a zero-character match.
* (asterisk) Matches any sequence of characters, including an empty string. For example, the search string "*cast" will match "cast", "forecast", and “outcast”, but will not match "forecaster" using default Calc settings.

If the option Search criteria = and <> must apply to whole cells is disabled in Tools > Options > LibreOffice Calc > Calculate, then "forecaster" will be a match using the "*cast" search string.
~ (tilde) Escapes the special meaning of a question mark, asterisk, or tilde character that follows immediately after the tilde character.

For example, the search string "why~?" matches "why?" but will not match "whys" nor "why~s".

Wildcard comparisons are not case sensitive, hence "A?" will match both "A1" and "a1".

These wildcards are supported in both Calc and Microsoft Excel. Therefore, if interoperability between the two applications is needed, choose to work with wildcards instead of regular expressions. Conversely, if interoperability is not necessary, consider using regular expressions for more powerful search capabilities.

Examples:

Stationery sales examples

Consider the following table showing sales and revenue information for a small stationery supplier. The string "N/A" refers to products that were not available for supply during the period covered by the data.

A B C
1 Product Sales Revenue
2 Pencil 20 $65
3 Pen 35 $85
4 Notebook 20 $190
5 Book 17 $180
6 Pencil case N/A N/A

In all examples based on this table, it should be noted that row 6 for pencil cases contains no numeric data and so will never contribute to the result of SUMIFS, whatever criteria are specified.

Formula Description Returns
=SUMIFS(B2:B6; B2:B6; ">=20") Here the function sums the numeric Sales data that are greater than or equal to 20. 75
=SUMIFS(C2:C6; B2:B6; ">=20"; C2:C6; ">70") Here the function locates entries greater than or equal to 20 in the Sales data that also have a value greater than $70 in the Revenue data, and sums the corresponding numeric entries in the Revenue data. $275
=SUMIFS(C2:C6; B2:B6; ">"&MIN(B2:B6); B2:B6; "<"&MAX(B2:B6)) Here the function calculates the sum of the numeric entries in the Revenue data that correspond to all values in the Sales data except the minimum and maximum. $255
=SUMIFS(C2:C6; A2:A6; "pen.*"; B2:B6; "<"&MAX(B2:B6)) This example will only work as described here if regular expressions are enabled. Here the function locates entries in the Product data that begin with the characters "pen" and have a value in the Sales data that is not the maximum, and sums the corresponding numeric entries in the Revenue data. $65
=SUMIFS(C2:C6; A2:A6; E2&".*"; B2:B6; "<"&MAX(B2:B6)) where cell E2 contains the string "pen" (entered without typing the double quotes). This example will only work as described here if regular expressions are enabled. If you need to change a criterion easily, you may want to specify it in a separate cell and use a reference to this cell in the condition of the SUMIFS function. Here the link to the cell is substituted with its content, giving the same result as the previous example. $65

Sporting equipment sales examples

The examples in this subsection are based on a small database of sales data for sports equipment, with the data organized as in the following table.

A B C D E
1 Date Sales Value Category Region Employee
2 2021-10-02 $1,508 Golf East Hans
3 2021-10-02 $410 Tennis North Kurt
4 2021-10-02 $2,340 Sailing South Ute
5 2021-10-03 $4,872 Tennis East Brigitte
6 2021-10-06 $3,821 Tennis South Fritz
7 2021-10-06 $2,623 Tennis East Fritz
8 2021-10-07 $3,739 Golf South Fritz
9 2021-10-08 $4,195 Golf West Ute
10 2021-10-10 $2,023 Golf East Hans
Formula Description Returns
=SUMIFS(B2:B10; B2:B10; ">=4000") Here the function sums the numeric entries in the Sales Value data that are greater than or equal to $4,000. This formula is equivalent to both =SUMIF(B2:B10; ">=4000") and =SUMIF(B2:B10; ">=4000"; B2:B10). $9,067
=SUMIFS(B2:B10; E2:E10; "ute") Here the function locates the entries for Ute in the Employee data and sums the corresponding numeric entries in the Sales Value data. This formula is equivalent to =SUMIF(E2:E10; "ute"; B2:B10) and this re-ordering of arguments highlights a key difference between the two functions - SumRange is the third argument for SUMIF and the first argument for SUMIFS. $6,535
=SUMIFS(B2:B10; CategoryData; "golf") where the named range CategoryData has been created to cover the cell range C2:C10. Here the function locates the entries for Golf in the Category data and sums the corresponding numeric entries in the Sales Value data. $11,465
=SUMIFS(B2:B10; D2:D10; F1; E2:E10; F2) where cells F1 and F2 contain the text strings ">=south" and "ute" respectively (both entered without typing the double quotes). Here the function locates the entries for South and West in the Region data that also have Ute in the Employee data, and sums the corresponding numeric entries in the Sales Value data. $6,535
=SUMIFS(B2:B10; A2:A10; DATE(2021; 10; 2); C2:C10; "tennis") Here the function locates the entries for 2021-10-02 in the Date column that also have Tennis in the Category data, and sums the corresponding numeric entries in the Sales Value data. $410
=SUMIFS(B2:B10; A2:A10; ">="&DATE(2021; 10; 6); E2:E10; "<>"&E8) Here the function locates the entries dated on or after 2021-10-06 in the Date column that do not have Fritz in the Employee data, and sums the corresponding numeric entries in the Sales Value data. $6,218
=SUMIFS(B2:B10; C2:C10; "tennis"; D2:D10; "east"; E2:E10; "fritz") Here the function locates the entries that have Tennis in the Category data, East in the Region data and Fritz in the Employee data. It sums the corresponding numeric entries in the Sales Value data. $2,623
=SUMIFS(B2:B10; D2:D10; "????"; E2:E10; "*e") This example will only work as described here if wildcards are enabled. Here the function locates the four-character entries in the Region data (East and West) that also have an entry in the Employee data that ends with the letter "e" or "E" (Brigitte and Ute). It sums the corresponding numeric entries in the Sales Value data. $9,067
=SUMIFS(B2:B10; C2:C10; "^t.*"; D2:D10; ".*h") This example will only work as described here if regular expressions are enabled. Here the function locates the entries for Tennis in the Category data that start with the letter "t" or "T" (Tennis) that also have an entry in the Region data that ends with the letter "h" or "H" (North and South). It sums the corresponding numeric entries in the Sales Value data. $4,231
=SUMIFS(B2:B10; E2:E10; "(?-i)ute") This example will only work as described here if regular expressions are enabled. The "(?-i)" mode modifier within the regular expression changes to a case-sensitive match and so no entries are found in the Employee data. Contrast this with the second example in this table. $0

Additional examples

For more examples, download and view this Calc spreadsheet.

Related LibreOffice functions:

AVERAGEIFS

COUNTIFS

SUMIF

ODF standard:

Section 6.16.63, part 2

Equivalent Excel function:

SUMIFS